Draghi’s Dangerous Farewell

PRINCETON – Mario Draghi risks deepening the eurozone’s problems in the final weeks of his eight-year term as president of the European Central Bank. He has promised that the ECB will reduce interest rates further to spur the eurozone economy. But policymakers have room for only modest rate cuts, which will do little to boost growth – and will put potentially intolerable pressure on the eurozone’s fragile banks. Back in June, Draghi said that the ECB was preparing a new dose of stimulus, including further reductions of its policy interest rate and a renewal of quantitative easing (QE) through purchases of government bonds. And…

Few City Blues on Brexit

The City of London was meant to be one of the big losers from Brexit but three years on from the referendum City firms regard themselves as fully prepared and no longer focus on the issue. Less than 1500 jobs have been moved, less than 1% of City employment. Many of you will know how one-sided the Financial Times has been on Brexit. It would not have been at all excessive to regard the paper as ‘remain central’. At times the language has bordered on incendiary and very often it has been at least over-excited. This is important because the FT…

On Futures Trading: An Interview with Jack Schwager

Mr. Schwager is a recognized industry expert in futures and hedge funds and the author of a number of widely acclaimed financial books. He is one of the founders of FundSeeder, a platform designed to find undiscovered trading talent worldwide and connect unknown successful traders with sources of investment capital. Previously, Mr. Schwager was a partner in the Fortune Group (2001-2010), a London-based hedge fund advisory firm. His prior experience also includes 22 years as Director of Futures research for some of Wall Street’s leading firms, most recently Prudential Securities. Mr. Schwager has written extensively on the futures industry and…

Opinion: The IMF’s latest no-deal warnings are sloppy and overblown

The International Monetary Fund has produced another analysis suggesting that a no-deal Brexit would lead to steep short-term declines in UK output. As before, its claims look exaggerated with some elements of their work not standing up to serious scrutiny. The IMF estimates are based on a host of highly pessimistic assumptions, some of which are out of date while others are not supported by academic evidence or real-world examples of how trade works. Worse still, some of the numbers the IMF uses – for example those related to ‘border disruptions’ – appear to be plucked from thin air. Claims…

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